During my travels I am wrote articles on a series of ecological projects under or above the water in different locations for SEED Magazine.

The first is about a character called uncle Pa in Jamaica: "Long Bay is a sleepy little seaside town in the northeastern parish of Portland, Jamaica. In the nearby hills southwest of the seaside, I met Uncle Pa, a 79-year-old man who is toothless but incredibly hardy. He has been going into the bush since he was a kid and, from the age of 19 on, he has provided sustenance from its vegetation for his 17 children. He knows every tree and shrub as well as the medicinal effect of every piece of bark, every leaf and every flower." Read more...

The second tells about Dinah Veeris and her botanical/medicinal garden in Curacao: "I met Dinah Veeris in her magnificent botanical garden where she propagates over 300 species of wild medicinal plants. The garden is called “Den Paradera,” which means “the place where you feel at home”. Dinah was born in Curaçao in 1939. She is soft-spoken with a humble and calm presence, most likely derived from her 50 years working as an educator." Read more...

The third article investigates rebuilding a shallow water ecosystem in the Dutch Antilles: "I’ve done over 400 dives all over the world, including Hawaii, the outer islands of Fiji, the Cook Islands and Scotland, but I have never seen so many different types of fish or been able to observe their natural behaviors as closely as on Bari Reef." Read more...

The fourth article I stumble across a Living Machine in the middle of a Hawaiian Gold Course: "At the Hualalai Resort, situated on the stunning Kailua-Kona Coast of Hawaii’s Big Island, humans have built a lake that functions as a “living machine” capable of filtering water, producing food, and sustaining populations of birds, fish, and plants native to this island chain." Read more...

The fifth articles sees that my 2003 efforts at environmental restoration in Hawaii established plant life in a barren area: "In 2003, I was fortunate enough to join a three-month ecological restoration class with Jill Wagner from Tree Hawaii, a non-profit, environmental educational organization. During this 12-week course, we learned about native habitat restoration in Hawaii through the collection of native seeds and the propagation of plants. We participated in forest habitat restoration at Kaloko-Honokohau National Park, which sits below the majestic Hualalai Volcano on the Kona Coast of the Big Island." Read more...